Please tell me what is the best treatment for Peyronie’s? Each Urologist in my country of Iran has a different idea about curing this disease. Will you please send me the best possible and easiest way of treatment?

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There is no best treatment for Peyronie’s. Much of the treatments are based upon the degree and duration of the deformity, the presence of pain or calcification and one’s own erectile function. Unfortunately, there is no evidence of any truly effective oral therapy for Peyronie’s disease and topical treatments have also not been shown to be beneficial. Various types of topical energy delivery systems including iontophoresis have been used with reports of mild benefit. Injection therapy with verapamil or Interferon has been reported to be beneficial as well. None of these therapies have been shown to be a cure, but may result in some improvement of deformity in 40-60% of men. Shock wave therapy has been used in several countries, but the emerging evidence is not very supportive of benefit. Lastly, surgery at this time remains the gold standard therapy for Peyronie’s disease for severe deformity, which interferes with sexual intercourse.

By the end of this year, there will be a new textbook directed to physicians around the world to educate them on Peyronie’s disease. This book will be published by the Humana Press and is scheduled to be released in September 2006. My advice to you at this time would be to seek consultation with a urologist at a university medical center and to continue to follow this website as many of the noted experts in the world on Peyronie’s disease do contribute to it. In addition, this website will likely be the place to find the most reliable updates on new treatments for Peyronie’s disease.

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